Chess Elo Page 4 [for mobile]

Grandmaster and International Master Norms

The Grandmaster (Woman Grandmaster) or International Master (Woman International Master) Norm is the minimum score at which the player may get the norm. The Grandmaster or International Master Norm is possible under the following 2 conditions:

1st. The player must meet the FIDE norm requirements.
2nd. The player score must provide, at least, the minimum Performance Rating needed for the norm but only under the minimum Opponents Average, both defined by FIDE.

The following is some of the FIDE norm requirements:
• The player must play, at minimum, 9 games.
• At least 50% of the opponents must be titled.
• For a GM norm, at least 1/3 with a minimum 3 must be GMs.
• For a IM norm, at least 1/3 with a minimum 3 must be IMs.

The following minimum Performance Rating is needed:
• 2600 for the Grandmaster Norm
(under Opponents Average at least 2380).
• 2450 for the International Master Norm
(under Opponents Average at least 2230).

• 2400 for the Woman Grandmaster Norm
(under Opponents Average at least 2180).
• 2250 for the Woman International Master Norm
(under Opponents Average at least 2030).

You can become an International Master if you have three 9-game-tournament International Master Norms, and if FIDE recalculated your current rating at 2400 even once. You can become a Grandmaster if you have three 9-game-tournament Grandmaster Norms, and if FIDE recalculated your current rating at 2500 even once.

If you hit a norm at a chess tournament, the chess tournament administration must issue you an official norm certificate. When you have three certificates and have met all the requirements, you may send your papers via your National chess federation to FIDE for approving your new high title.

To get the third FIDE title – FIDE Master, you do not need to have any norms. The main requirement is to achieve a published rating at some time or other at:
• 2300 for the FIDE Master (FM) Title.
• 2100 for the Woman FIDE Master (WFM) Title.

New Rating

New Rating of the chess player is calculated in a simple way. For its calculation, the following formula is used:
New Rating = Old Rating + Rating Change
Rating Change is rounded off to the nearest 1 or zero. 0.5 is rounded up.

Opponents Average

There is no need to explain Opponents Average; it is quite understandable. The only thing you must remember is that the FIDE rule of 400 points in rating difference has impact on Opponents Average too as shown below.

If you are rated 2400, and 2 your opponents 1000 each, the FIDE average of your opponents will be not 1000 as expected but 2000 (2400 – 400). If you are rated 1800, and 2 your opponents 2400 each, the FIDE average of your opponents will be not 2400 as expected but 2200 (1800 + 400).

Conclusion

Elegant and beautiful, this is the Elo rating system which was named after its creator Arpad Emrick Elo who had improved the original Harkness system. Nowadays the chess organizations usually use their own interpretation of the Elo system.

Elo rating is often used to mean a player chess rating as calculated by FIDE. However, other chess organizations, National federations, Internet servers, and so one have adopted Elo and Harkness general ideas, but added their own rules to them.

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